Identify Maryland Wild Fungi Mushrooms

Identify Wild Fungi and Mushrooms in the Maryland Mountains
Do You Know These Fungi?


Tiny white mushrooms growing on a Black Walnut

I need help to identify Maryland wild fungi and mushrooms.

I found these tiny white mushrooms growing on a Black Walnut sitting in the middle of the Catoctin Trail near its northern trailhead. I believe they are Marasmius rotula. Do you find them interesting? Any ideas?

But I’m not always so successful to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Below are thirty three fungi  I found growing along Maryland trails that I could not identify. I wonder if members of The Mycological Association of Washington, DC could help me?

Can you identify them for me (Genus and species if able)?

My interest in mushrooms/fungi is purely love of nature … I only eat mushrooms that come from the store, not from the field, no matter how confident I am of their identity. The fungi below are roughly organized by what they are growing on.

Click on any of these numbers to visit a numbered fungus waiting to be identified, or just scroll down the page to visit them all one after another.
Fungi growing at bases of trees:  F01 F02 F03
Fungi Growing on the ground:    F04 F05 F06 F07 F08 F09 F10 F11 F12 F13 F14
Fungi growing on living trees:    F15 F16 F17 F18
Fungi growing on dead wood:    F19 F20 F21 F22 F23 F24 F25 F26 F27 F28 F29 F30 F31 F32 F33



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Fungus #01


Big round orange and white fungus with many fan-like lobes at base of tree next to AT near Wolfsville Road.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This immense fungus at the base of a tree was growing in August right next to the Appalachian Trail, where the trail was ascending the hill just south of Wolfsville Road. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 01" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Thanks.



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Fungus #02


small size shelf fungus at base of tree. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

small size shelf fungus growing up side of tree.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

These small white shelf fungi were growing at the base and up the side of a tree in December right next to the Appalachian Trail, about five miles south of Gathland State Park. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 02" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Thanks.



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Fungus #03


Flat ovoid orange and white fungus at base of tree next to Sugarloaf Mountain Blue Trail.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This flat ovoid fungus was growing at the base of a tree in August near the Sugarloaf Mountain Blue Trail right off of Mount Ephraim Road. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 03" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Thanks.



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Fungus #04


Red button mushroom with white polka dots growing in leaf litter next to trail on west side of Sugarloaf Mountain.    Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This pretty red button mushroom was found in July growing in leaf litter by the side of a connecting trail on the west side of Sugarloaf Mountain. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this mushroom, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 04" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Thanks.



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Fungus #05


tall slender white mushroom with design on top of cap. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

tall mushroom bent over to show gills.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This tall slender mushroom had an elegant design on top of its cap. It was found growing in August on Sugarloaf Mountain by the side of the White Trail on the east side of the mountain. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this mushroom, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 05" in addition to your observations about this mushroom. Thanks.



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Fungus #06


fat little white mushroom with conical cap.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

fat little white mushroom bent over to show gills.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This fat white little mushroom was found growing in August on Sugarloaf Mountain by the side of the White Trail on the east side of the mountain. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this mushroom, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 06" in addition to your observations about this mushroom. Thanks.



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Fungus #07


fat little white mushroom with conical cap, which is broken.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

fat little white mushroom bent over to show gills.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This fat white little mushroom was found growing in August on Sugarloaf Mountain by the side of the White Trail on the east side of the mountain; it’s perhaps the same kind of mushroom as Fungus 06 above. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this mushroom, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 07" in addition to your observations about this mushroom. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #08


Flower-like orange fungus growing in leaf litter.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This pretty flower-like orange fungus growing in leaf litter was found in July, fifteen feet off the Sugarloaf Mountain Blue Trail, halfway between Mount Ephraim Road and White Rocks overlook. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 08" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #09


Red mushroom with white stem growing in leaf litter.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

Red mushroom with white stem turned upside down to expose gills.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This pretty red mushroom with white stem was growing in leaf litter. It was found in September next to the Appalachian Trail just off a power-line right-of-way near the AT Washington Monument. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this mushroom, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 09" in addition to your observations about this mushroom. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #10


Flower-like yellow fungus growing in leaf litter next to a rock.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This pretty yellow flower-like mushroom was growing in the ground next to a rock in the middle of the Appalachian Trail north of Foxville Road in September. It may be a "Honey Fungus" (Armillaria mellea) or a Cantharellus cascadensis. If you have some helpful comments about the actual identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 10" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #11


Flat fungus that is orange but black area on one edge.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This flat fungus that is orange but black on one edge was growing in the ground near the Appalachian Trail north of Foxville Road in September. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 11" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #12


Mushroom with fat stalk, cap is white with gray edge and tan spot on top.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This white mushroom was found in August on the Thurston Griggs Trail, a side trail west of the Appalachian Trail. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 12" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #13


White mushroom with cap curled upward.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This white mushroom was found in June on the Catoctin Trail north of MD77 (Foxville Road). It was most unusual. For most mushrooms the cap is curled downward, but in this mushroom, the cap was curled upward, showing the gills on the sides. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 13" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #14


Plain orange oblong mushroom growing up from under a rock.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This plain orange mushroom was found growing in July on the Catoctin Trail near Bob’s Hill, pushing its way out from under a rock. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this mushroom, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 14" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #15


Small white shelf fungi growing up the side of a live tree.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This small white shelf fungi were found in May, just off the Catoctin Trail near White Rock, growing on a live tree. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 15" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #16


Whitish tan fungus, looking a bit like tiny icicles, growing on the bark of a live tree along with lichen and moss.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This fungus was growing on a live tree in December just off the Appalachian Trail near Annapolis Rocks. My guess as to its identity is that it is an immature Hericium fungus, perhaps of species americanum, growing on the bark of the tree. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 16" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #17


Two brown shelf fungi with white edging.  They are growing on a live tree.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

These two interesting shelf fungi were seen in September growing on a live tree by the C&O Canal east of Harper’s Ferry. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of these fungi, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 17" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #18


Shelf fungi growing on live tree.  Some have algae growing on them.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

Shelf fungi viewed from below.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

These are two views of shelf fungi in July growing on a live tree by the Appalachian Trail south of Gathland State Park. The left image is looking down on the shelves, and algae can be seen growing on some of them. The right image is looking up at them from below. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of these fungi, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 18" in addition to your observations about this mushroom. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #19


Many shelf-like fungi growing on a log.  They are orange with a black spot in their centers.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

These shelf-like fungi were found in September growing on a dead log (what other kind of log is there?) just off the Appalachian Trail north of Foxville Road. They appear similar to Fungus #11 above. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 19" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #20


A cluster of orange shelf-like fungi growing out of the sawed-off end of a log.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

I found this cluster of orange shelf-like fungi in June growing out of the sawed-off end of this log in the Shenandoah on Hawksbill Mountain. Well … OK … I admit that that isn’t Maryland, but I found this cluster of fungi attractive. They look a little like Chicken of the Woods, but I generally associate that with living trees. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 20" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #21


Red globs on a rotting log.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

These red globs on a rotting log were found next to the Appalachian Trail north of Gathland State Park. I think this fungus may be Wolf’s Milk slime mold (Lycogala epidendrum). If you have some helpful comments about the actual identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 21" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #22


White irregularly shaped globs on a rotten log.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

These white irregularly shaped globs on a rotting log were found in September next to the Appalachian Trail near the Pogo campsite. I have no idea what they are, but if you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 22" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #23


Two sets of small mushrooms with conical caps on a log.  The left-most ones are somewhat tan, and the right-most ones are more whitish.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

Two groups of small mushrooms with conical tops were growing in October on a log next to the Appalachian Trail north of Raven Rock Road. I don’t know if these two sets of mushrooms are the same or perhaps they are two different ones. They are about an inch or two tall. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of these mushrooms, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 23" in addition to your observations about these mushrooms, plus make sure to refer to the mushrooms on the left and/or the mushrooms on the right.. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #24


Large white fungus with multiple antler-like lobes.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This very large "antler"-like fungus was growing on a log near the northern trailhead of the Catoctin Trail in August. I’m not sure, but I think It may be a Bondarzewia berkeleyi. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 24" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #25


An orange shelf-like fungus growing on a rotten log.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

I found this orange shelf-like fungi in August growing on a rotten log on the Catoctin Trail near its northernmost trailhead. It looks a little like Chicken of the Woods, but I generally associate that with living trees. It also appears similar to Fungus 20. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 25" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #26


An orange shelf-like fungus growing on a rotten log.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

I found this orange shelf-like fungi in June growing on a rotten log on the Catoctin Trail north of MD77 (Foxville Road). It looks a bit like Chicken of the Woods, but without the bright yellow edging. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 26" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #27


Flat ovoid orange and white fungi growing on a rotten log.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This cluster of fan-like fungi were found in September growing on a rotten log next to the Appalachian Trail near the Pogo campsite. It appears similar to Fungus03 above If you have some helpful comments about the identity of these fungi, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 27" in addition to your observations about these fungi. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #28


Orange and white shelf fungi growing on a log.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This cluster of colorful shelf-fungi were found in September growing on a log next to the Catoctin Trail near the Manor Area State Park. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of these fungi, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 28" in addition to your observations about these fungi. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #29


Green and white shelf fungi growing on a log.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This cluster of colorful shelf-fungi were found in September growing on a log next to the Catoctin Trail near the Manor Area State Park. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 29" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #30


Orange and white shelf fungi growing on a log.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This cluster of colorful shelf-fungi were found in September growing on a log next to the Appalachian Trail near Warner Hollow. They appear similar to Fungus 28 above. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 30" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #31


Numerous white shelf fungi growing on a dead tree that is still standing.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This mass of small white shelf fungi were growing on this dead tree in September next to the Appalachian Trail near the Pogo campsite. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of this fungus, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 31" in addition to your observations about this fungus. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #32


Large white shelf-like fungi growing on a dead tree that is still standing.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

This tree has two different fungi: large white fungi and a mass of small white shelf-like fungi lower down on the tree. They were growing on this dead tree in September next to the Appalachian Trail near the Pogo campsite. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of these fungi, especially the large white ones, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 32" in addition to your observations about these fungi, being clear whether you are referring to the large fungi or the small fungi. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Fungus #33


Shelf fungi growing on live tree.  Some have algae growing on them.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

Shelf fungi viewed from below.  Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms.

These two images are of fungi growing on the same log. I suspect that they are the same fungi, but the greener ones have algae growing on them. I passed this log white hiking the Catoctin Trail near Cunningham Falls in November. If you have some helpful comments about the identity of these fungi, please click here and leave a comment that includes "Fungus 33" in addition to your observations about these fungi. Help me to identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.



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Click on a number below to revisit a numbered fungus, or just scroll up the page.

F01 F02 F03 F04 F05 F06 F07 F08 F09 F10 F11 F12 F13 F14 F15 F16 F17 F18 F19 F20 F21 F22 F23 F24 F25 F26 F27 F28 F29 F30 F31 F32 F33

Please provide comments below (fungus # plus observations) in this section of my website to help me identify Maryland wild fungi mushrooms. Thanks.

AT Maryland Challenge

Hiking The Appalachian Trail
The Maryland Challenge

<< Return to Maryland Hiking and History Page
Go to Maryland Challenge Selector Listing below >>
Go to Maryland Challenge Map to compare with the listing >>

There is much lore and legendary tradition to hiking the Appalachian Trail, including the so-called "Maryland Challenge:" hiking the Maryland section of the Appalachian Trail in ONE DAY! You may miss some things hurrying to meet the Maryland Challenge, so this virtual hike can be done in less than one day and still see plenty of the special sites available in Maryland.

Join me hiking from the Mason-Dixon Line to Harper’s Ferry, or the other way if you prefer, and see all the sites in a much more relaxed and comfortable way.

Visit the Appalachian Trail, starting from any point in the listing below, and virtually hike from place to place — click on the up arrow (Appalachian Trail Up Arrow) to hike toward Maine, or click on the down arrow (Appalachian Trail Down Arrow) to hike toward Georgia; the up and down arrows are located at the left side of each Appalachian Trail page.


Please provide comments below on the photo galleries in this section of my website. Thanks.

MD South Mountain in the Civil War


Appalachian Trail on South Mountain Crosses Four Sites of the Civil War
<< Return to the History section of the Maryland Hiking and History page

Image of Reno Monument at Fox's Gap in South Mountain

In 1862 Robert E. Lee brought his southern troops up into Maryland as the beginning of an invasion of the north during the American Civil War. General George B. McClellan of the Union Army of the Potomac had learned that Lee had divided his army between forces invading Harper’s Ferry and those stationed in Boonsboro, MD, to the west of South Mountain, in preparation for the invasion of northern cities to the east. To head off Lee, and take advantage of the split in his armies, McClellan attacked the southern armies at three gaps in South Mountain to push through to Boonsboro:
  > Turner’s Gap near Boonsboro;
  > Fox’s Gap near Boonsboro; and
  > Crampton Gap a bit farther south.
Each of these three sites are National Heritage Landmarks.
The Appalachian Trail runs through each of these three gaps, and there are some things to see in each of them.

Additionally, there is a fourth site at High Rock, mostly without anything to see other than a great panoramic view of the valley. Union troops were stationed there to spy on southern troop movements in the north.

In the Battle of South Mountain, the Union forces had mixed results attacking the southern forces, which held Fox’s and Turner’s Gaps precariously until nightfall, and gave Lee time to reorganize. This was, however, sufficient victory to give the Union leadership a much needed morale boost. McClellan failed, however, to capitalize on Lee’s weakened position, allowing Harper’s Ferry to fall into the hands of southern forces, and leading up to the terrible and bloody battle of Antietam, which led to southern forces retreating back across the Potomac, and led to President Abraham Lincoln replacing McClellan as commander of the Army of the Potomac, for being not sufficiently aggressive in his tactics.

Turner’s Gap: The Old South Mountain Inn is located in this gap, just uphill from the Appalachian Trail. This inn was founded as early as 1732. In 1859, John Brown and his men, in an effort to free southern slaves, captured the inn as a staging area for his raid on the armory in Harper’s Ferry. In the Civil War Battle of South Mountain, the inn was the headquarters for southern General D. H. Hill. A later owner of the inn, Madeline Vinton Dahlgren, also built a stone chapel in 1881, a short distance from the inn, and that chapel stands today immediately next to the Appalachian Trail.
(Visit the photo gallery for Turner’s Gap).

Fox’s Gap: General Jesse Lee Reno led his troops in attacking this strategic gap, and was killed in the effort. A monument was later placed there by his men in his honor, and it remains there today, immediately next to the Appalachian Trail.
(Visit the photo gallery for Fox’s Gap).

Crampton Gap: This was the scene of the greatest Union success. Later, after the war, it became the home of George Alfred Townsend, a war correspondent during the Civil War, who wrote under the pen-name of Gath. During the Civil War he was an immensely popular writer, but his writing style later became less popular. On his estate in Crampton Gap, he erected the War Correspondents Arch, honoring those who risked their lives in his profession. His estate was known as Gapland, and is now a Maryland State Park called Gathland State Park.
(Visit the photo gallery for Crampton Gap / Gapland/ Gathland State Park).

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Please provide comments below on the photo galleries in this section of my website. Thanks.

MD Gaithersburg Latitude Observatory

History and Science in the Skies
Gaithersburg Latitude Observatory
<< Return to Maryland Hiking and History Page

(Gallery Has Two Pictures)

View of historic Gaithersburg Latitude Observatory

This wooden building doesn’t look like much from the outside, but it was actually part of an international cooperative astronomical study of the earth's precession (wobble) on its polar axis of rotation. This Gaithersburg Latitude Observatory was built in 1899 as part of a system of six international latitude observatories; highly remarkable scientific cooperation during a period of terrible international warfare. The observatory and grounds are now designated a National Historic Landmark.

The "Skywatching" programs are held evenings at the Latitude Observatory, and admission is free. Get this on your calendar now: International Observe the Moon Night will be observed on Saturday, October 28, starting at 7pm. The calendar of events is on the museum's Facebook page.

Pagoda shaped Meridian Mark Pier for aligning the Latitude Telescope

This pagoda-looking thing was used for precisely calibrating the orientation of the telescope. The telescope was aimed through a window in the side of the building (see picture of observatory above) at crosshairs in these windows to ensure that it was correctly oriented, since orientation of the base and mounting of the telescope could drift from day to day. In this way, the measurements at this telescope could reliably be compared with similar measurements at the sites in the cooperating locations internationally, to create findings that could be relied on.

MD Gambrill State Park

Catoctin Mountain Range of Maryland …
Gambrill State Park

<< Return to Maryland Hiking and History Page


Please provide comments below on the photo galleries in this section of my website. Thanks.


MD Frederick Municipal Forest

Catoctin Mountain Range of Maryland …
Frederick Municipal Forest

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Please provide comments below on the photo galleries in this section of my website. Thanks.


MD Manor Area Of Cunningham Falls State Park

Catoctin Mountain Range of Maryland …
Manor Area of Cunningham Falls State Park

<< Return to Maryland Hiking and History Page

Map of Falls Area of Cunningham Falls State Park with red dots indicating points to be visited

Click to see one of these opportunities for hiking in the Manor Area of the Cunningham Falls State Park


Please provide comments below on the photo galleries in this section of my website. Thanks.


MD Cunningham Falls State Park

Catoctin Mountain Range of Maryland …
Falls Area of Cunningham Falls State Park

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Map of Falls Area of Cunningham Falls State Park with red dots indicating points to be visited

Click to see one of these opportunities for hiking in the Falls Area of the Cunningham Falls State Park


Please provide comments below on the photo galleries in this section of my website. Thanks.


MD Catoctin Mountain Park NPS

Catoctin Mountain Range of Maryland …
Catoctin Mountain Park (NPS)

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Please provide comments below on the photo galleries in this section of my website. Thanks.


MD Catoctin Trail

Hiking The Catoctin Trail
in Maryland
<< Return to Maryland Hiking and History Page

Map of Catoctin Trail

Visit the Catoctin Trail, starting from any point in the listing below, and virtually hike from place to place on the trail — click on the up arrow (Catoctin Trail Up Arrow) to hike toward the northern-most trailhead, or click on the down arrow (Catoctin Trail Down Arrow) to hike toward the southern-most trailhead; the up and down arrows are located at the top of each Catoctin Trail page.
Find the places in the listing below on the map to the left marked by large red dots.